Mech Piloting


The modern war mech is an evolution of heavy haul equipment. Outfitting agricultural machines and freight loaders with armor plating, weapon mounts and battlefield navcomms is what derived the very classification of "War Mech". It is debated as to who made them first, the Vesk Coldbloods certainly have a long heritage, and the corporations have used mechs in skirmishes for over a century, in either case, mechs have become a prominent figure in surface conflict.

Grids and Scales


To account for the speed and range of such large war machines, mechs use a custom 25 ft. hexagonal grid scale. This scale is similar to starship scale, but unlike starship and their undefined hex sizes, mechs can be intergrated into character or starship scale.

Mech Scale
Mech scale utilizes a custom scale direclty suited for their size and power. In mech scale the map grid is defined as 25 ft. hexagons, and the rounds is 6 seconds long. In mech scale, all mechs occupy one hex and reach one hex forward for melee range. Each mech frame and weapon states their movement and range in hexes. In mech scale all pilots may make one attack without penelaty, or two attacks with a -4 penalty to both attacks. These attacks can be any combination of ranged or melee wattacks. Once launched, controlling a tracking weapon does not count toward the number of attacks per round.
It is possible to have character scale entities engage in Mech Scale combat. In such a case, simply considers the distance the character scale entity would move and reach as increments of 25 ft, discarding any extra feet per turn. Regardless of their melee reach, character scale entities must enter a mech's space to make melee attacks. This is not intended a penalty to character scale entities, rather it is because mechs, regardless of their size, only occupy one hex.

Mech in Character Scale
Character scale uses a square grid with each square representing 5 ft. Each mech base frame states the space the mech occupies in character scale, and their feet per round movement speed. While in character scale, movement is handled like any other character, the mech can move a certain number of feet per round. It is worth noting that mech weapons inflict farm more damage than any character scale weapon. Thus, a hit to an average character scale entity from a mech weapon will likely be a life threating event.

Mech in Starship Scale
Abc

Piloting and Navigation


From the smallest courier mech to the largest war machine, mechs are an amalgamation of complex mechanical systems and advanced technologies. Mech engines are powerful devices fitted in the smallest possible housings. Whether technological or mystical these engines output power to drive propulsion and weapons system. While a mech's systems may not be as complex as a starship their power is as real and a pilot's ability to pilot one is arguably as difficult, certainly as dangerous.
Piloting a mech utilizes the Piloting skill, no special feat required. In its most basic form, piloting a mech is like piloting a car, you learn and practice and with time you can handle one on your own. The real difficulty is managing the weapons, defense, communications, sensory, and navigation systems all at the same time. If you are proficient in the piloting skill, moving a mech for basic function requires no skill check. You can use the computers skill in place of piloting, but you take -4 whenever you must make a piloting skill check. The real test of a pilot's skill is in combat. If you are not proficient in either piloting or computers, you cannot pilot a mech.

Combat


Combat Steps
1. Determine Awareness
2. Determine Initiative Order
3. Determine Suprise Round
4. First Normal Combat Round
5. Continuing Combat

Mechs were designed and built for a singular purpose, to fight! A mech that never sees combat barely qualifies for the name. Even the most mundane mechs, those that load freighters on star docks or haul containers of grain through fields, these labor mechs are still very much capable of combat, they may not have weapon mounts or thick armor but their frames and systems are echoes of their iron clad brothers.
Mech combat utilizes an amalgamation of both the character scale rules and starship rules found in Starfinder. Determining awareness, initiative order and surprise is done as per the Starfinder character combat rules (SF 238), some systems may provide a bonus. Melee and range attacks require a piloting skill check akin to the starship rules.
The combat rules that govern character combat apply to mech combat, with only a few exceptions. Even though the largest mechs may be covered in almost a dozen weapon mounts, attacking is still handled in character scale by the standard rules. You make a piloting check to attack with one weapon, or all weapons with a -4 penalty. You may switch between ranged and melee attacks without penalty. The only unique rule to mech comes from starships, tracking weapons (computers use checks).

Arc of Fire
Being so heavy and cumbersome, mechs cannot turn and maneuver as readily as a biological creature. Mech pilots know the importance of facing and tactical movement as mechs cannot simply turn in place to engage or defend an enemy behind it. Mechs have four firing arcs: front left (FL), front right (FR), rear left (RL), and rear right (RR). Mechs are built with weapon mounts over their frame, any weapon, besides a turret, must be fitted into one of these mounts. A mech turret is designed to be able to fire in a 360° radius. In both character and mech scale there are spaces within certain arcs that weapons in two arcs can target. See the Character Scale and Mech Scale diagrams.

INITIATIVE
Initiative in mech combat utilizes character scale initiative (SF 238). Mech pilots apply their normal initiative bonus. Initiative is then handled in the same way as character scale (SF 238).

Movement Possible Maneuver Check
Each mech has three speeds listed. The first entry listed, before the slash, is the mech's tactical speed, the mech may move this number of feet per round while in character scale. The second entry after the slash is the mech's speed defined as hexes. The mech may move this number of hexes per turn while in Mech Scale. The third entry in brackets is the mech's overland speed, this is the distance per hour the mech can travel overland, that is, while not in combat. Mechs move backwards at half speed. Systems and critical conditons may change one, two, or all three of these figures.
While in combat, if you use two move actions in a round (sometimes called a "double move"), you can move up to double your speed. If you spend the entire round running (using the run action; see page SF 248), you can move up to quadruple your speed (also see Turning). You can double your overland speed by making a piloting maneuver check against DC20. This DC may be modified by terrain and/or environemntal conditions. You can not quardruple your overland speed. Character scale, mech scale and overland speed is halved in difficult terrain (see Terrain).

Armour Class
Melee attacks and direct fire weapons target this armor class to determine if the attack hits. The mech's AC is calculated from the pilot's ranks in the Pilot skill, the mech's armor, and any modifier for the mech's size. Performing some maneuvers can temporarilty modify your AC. Sudden or dangerous turns can accumulate a maneuver penalty that applies until the start of your next turn. Critical condition may also modify your AC.
AC = 10 + Pilot Ranks + Mech Armor + Size Modifier + Maneuver Penalties
Target Lock
The mech's target lock is their ability to evade tracking weapons. This figure is modified for the mech's size and maneuverability. Tracking weapons target this armor class to determine whether they hit the target or not. The mech's TL is calculated from the pilot's ranks in the Pilot skill, any countermeasures the mech may have, any modifier for the mech's size. Performing some maneuvers can temporarilty modify your TL. Sudden or dangerous turns can accumulate a maneuver bonus that applies until the start of your next turn. Critical condition may also modify your AC.
TL = 10 + Pilot Ranks + Countermeasures + Size Modifier + Stunt Modifiers
Attack, Melee Piloting Check
You can make melee attacks against a target within melee range. Melee attacks can only be directed to a space in either the left or right front arcs that the mech can reach. In mech scale, melee range is one hex forward. In character scale, melee range is any square the mech can reach in either the left or right front arc. Larger mechs may have a longer melee reach in character scale. To make a melee attack, roll a pilot skill check against the target's Armor Class (AC). If you meet or exceed the target's TAC you deal the damage listed for the weapon. On a roll of a natural 20, if the attack would normally hit, you score a critical hit (see Critical Hits). Mechs cannot male melee attacks while prone, overloaded or immobile.
Attack = Pilot skill check + modifier vs target's AC
Attack, Ranged (direct) Piloting Check
Direct range attacks are made by making a piloting check against the target’s TAC. Each weapon lists a range increment, attacks made within this range suffer no range penalty. You suffer an accumulative -2 for each range increment beyond the first. Range weapons can fire up to 10 range increments away. On a roll of a natural 20, if the attack would hit, you score a critical hit (see Critical Hits).
Attack = Pilot skill check + modifier vs target's AC
Attack, Ranged (tracking) Computer Check
Tracking weapon projectiles are slow and must home in using the target's TL. A tracking weapon's projectile has a listed speed; once fired, it moves that speed toward its target. Each subsequent round you must succeed at a computers check against the target's TL to continue to move it toward its target. On a failure, the projectile is lost. If the projectile reaches the target's hex, it deals the listed damage. If the target moves, the targeting attack can turn to track the target. The projectiles have perfect maneuverability. On the final check, if you roll a natural 20, if the attack would hit, you score a critical hit (see Critical Hits)
Attack = Computer skill check + modifier vs target's TL
Attack of Opportunity
An attack of opportunity works exactly as it does for any other creature (SF 248).

Reach
Melee attacks can be made into hexes within the left or right front firing arcs. Reach is the distance you mech can reach to make a melee attack while in character scale. Larger mechs may have a longer reach. While in mech scale, mechs can reach in to the adjacent hexes to make a melee attack.

Hull points
Hull Points (HP) is the total amount of damage the mech can take before it becomes inoperative. A mech with O Hull Points isn't destroyed, though many of its systems may no longer function, it is immobile and cannot attack. A mech can not have less than o hull points, any damage sustained while the mech is at 0 Hull Points is negated but the mech still taked critical hits equal euqal to the damage that would have been sustained.

Critical Hits
Table: Critical Hits
Critical Hits
D%System
01-05%Cockpit
06-20%Sensors
21-50%System
(determin randomly)
51-75%Weapon
(determin randomly)
76-95%Locomotion
96-100%Power Core

Pilot

Mechs were built for traversing extreme terrain to engage heavily fortified points. In Starfinder, it is a real possibility that a mech may face off against a biological creature in combat. It is for this reason that mech combat can be played out in character scale or mech scale. A critical hit scored against any target other than a mech (or starship) uses the character scale critical hit rules (SF 245). A critical scored against a mech uses the critical hit system below. A critical hit scored against a starship uses the starship critical hit table (SF 321).
Mech Criticals Critical hits against mechs use the startship critical system with a hit location table specific for mechs. Whn you score a critical hit against a mech, double damage all damge dealt. Further, the attacking PC should also roll on the table below to determine which of the target mech's key systems is hit; that system gains a critical damage condition (see below). If the system isn't currently critically damaged, it gains the glitching condition. If it is critically damaged again, the critical condition increases by one step of severity (glitching becomes malfunctioning; malfunctioning becomes wrecked). A critical effect is also scored whenever the mech's hull takes damage that causes its total amount of damage to exceed its Critical Threshold, or a multiple of that threshold. For example, a mech with 100 Hull Points and a Critical Threshold of 20 takes critical damage each time its accumulated amount of Hull Point damage exceeds 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 points (and so on). An individual attack does not need to deal more than 20 damage to score critical damage against this mech; it just needs to be the attack that pushes the mech's total damage above a multiple of its Critical Threshold. A mech can take critical damage even when it's total Hull Points are 0.
To determine which system is affected, roll d% and consult the Critical Hits table. The three critical conditions have universal penalties that apply to the entire mech (see below). Some individual systems have effects the occur when they receive a critical condition. If the system already has the wrecked condition, apply its critical damage to the next system down on the chart.

Glitched
A glitching system isn't operating at peak performance. Skill checks involving the system take a -2 penalty. If the system already has this condition, exchange it for the Malfunctioning condition. Individual systems that receive this condition may impose additional penalties.
Malfunctioning
A malfunctioning system is difficult to control. Skill checks involving this system take a -4 penalty. If the power core is malfunctioning, all actions aboard the mech not involving the power core take a -2 penalty; this penalty stacks with penalties from critical damage conditions affecting other systems. If the system already has this condition, exchange it for the Wrecked condition. Individual systems that receive this condition may impose additional penalties.
Wrecked
A wrecked system is minimally functional. Skill checks involving this system automatically fail. If the power core is wrecked, all actions take a additional -4 penalty; this penalty stacks with penalties from critical damage conditions affecting other systems. If the system already has this condition, apply the Glitched condition to the system below this one on the Critical Hits table. Individual systems that receive this condition may impose additional penalties.

Mech Locations


Cockpit Abc
Sensor Abc
System Abc
Weapon Abc
Locomotion Abc
Power Core Abc
Pilot Abc

Maneuvers & Conditions


A maneuver check is a piloting skill roll to determine whether a maneuver or stunt succeeds. Some actions or stunts that do not normally require maneuver checks, may require them if your mech has critical conditions, or in difficult terrain and/or environments. You may use the Computing skill in place of Piloting, but substituted checks suffest a -8 penalty. A maneuver or action that requires a computing check does not suffer this penalty.

Climbing Maneuver Check
Climbing with a mech is possible. To climb make a piloting skill check (a maneuver check) at DC20 plus any terrain modifiers. A successful check enables the mech to climb one tenth of its base speed in any direction. There are systems and customizations that may decrease the difficulty of climb checks and/or increase the mech's climb speed. A failure on a climb check causes the mech to fall (see Falling) and become prone (see Prone).

Communications Possible Computer Check
Most mechs comes with a navcom, this system functions as a communications system. A basic navcom enables you to send and receive communication within 10 miles. A friendly starship, orbital satellite or base can relay communications to any point of a planet's surface or orbit. An advanced navcom does this without needing a relay and can function as a relay for basic systems. No skill check is required to communicate with a friendly comms system. Trying to decode an unfriendly signal requires a computers check against the encryption level of the opposing navcom. Mechs may have countermeasures that make decrypting their communications more difficult.

Death From Above Maneuver Check
Death From Above is a long standing last ditch maneuver that sees you launch your mech into the air aiming to land it onto of a target. To make this maneuver you mech must be fitted with a system that allows you to jump at least twice your height. You can make this maneuver against a target of your size category or lower. As a full round action, make a piloting maneuver check against the AC of the target +5. If your check beats the DC you land your mech on the target dealing 1d10 damage times your size category to it. Your mech suffers damage equal to half the damage you inflicted in the target. When you land you must make an opposed piloting maneuver check (a creature makes a DEX or STR check). If you fail your mech falls prone.

Emergency Escape Maneuver Check
The greatest strength of a mech can also be its greatest weakness. Mechs are essentially heavy iron tanks that walk on legs. In a standard vehicle, should the engine take rupturing damage it is still relatively easy to escape, simply open the door and run, this is not so easy in a mech as they are often very tall and built for combat maneuvers, not passenger comfort. To make an emergency exit from a mech roll a DEX check against DC25 as a full round action, you receive the size rank of the mech as a bonus to your roll. On a successful check, you reach the ground. If the check fails you are stuck in the mech. You can attempt an emergency escape check once per round.

Falling Maneuver Check
In a towering steel shell, falling any distance is not a good idea. You take 1d10 damage for each round your fell times your size category. At the GM's discretion, mechs fitted with Orbital Deployment systems may utilize such systems to control their fall and land safely. Becoming prone is not falling.

Jumping Maneuver Check
As a full round action, you can make a piloting check against DC25, plus any terrain modifiers, to make your mech jump up and forward. While in character scale the distance is equal to one tenth of the mech's character speed rating. While in mech scale the distance travelled is equal to one tenth of the mech's hex speed rounded down. If the amount rounds to zero the mech cannot jump a distance significant enough to affect movement. Jump Jets can be added to increase the distance jumped. The distance travelled up is significant for the consideration of mechs jumping over obstacles or up terrain levels. If your piloting check fails, or the mech fails to clear the height of the obstacle or elevation, your mech falls prone (see Prone).
Maneuver check Jump DC = 15 + terrain modifiers (jump check = piloting + size modifier)

Navigation Computer Check
In most situations navigating does not require a skill check. A navigation check or the DC may be modified by terrain or other miscellaneous factors A glitched or wrecked system may require you to make navigation checks when normally none are required. The GM may advise of environmental conditions, blizzards, sandstorms, electrical storms, or signal interference for example, that may require a navigation check. To make a navigation check roll a computers check against the environment conditions.

Orbital Deployment Maneuver Check
Militant forces aim to get mech and pilot on to a battlefield as quickly and safely as possible. Orbital deployment is a quick deployment method where mechs are dropped from starships onto the battlefield. This deployment method negates the need for mechs to walk into a hot zone, in the process avoiding possible detection or attack. Orbital deployment is an option only available to mechs with the orbital deployment system (unless you want to automatically fail the descent control check).
Descent Orbital deployment is simple to initiate, jump! At the initial launch, chose a space on the battlefield (the Drop Zone). Make a Control Descent pilot maneuver check against DC 20. This check may be modified by environmental conditions, the GM may impose penalties involving the condition and status of the drop ship. If you pass the check your mech is falling in a controlled and safe manner. If you fail the check your mech is out of control. It takes 1d4+1 turns before you reach the battlefield surface. Your orbital deployment system comes fitted with stabilizing systems to aid descent. You may re-attempt a failed Control Descent check once each round while you are falling. If you pass, you gain control of your descent. Each round you have control you may make a Control Scatter piloting maneuver check against DC20 to reduce the randomness of the landing location by 1 dice each success (see below). If you fail to gain control of your descent (you fail to pass ANY Control Descent check) you land scattered (see below), you automatically fail the Safe Landing check, and take 1d10 damage for each round your fell times your size category.
Scatter In the final turn of your descent, roll 1d8 (1d6 in mech scale) to determine the direction the fall took you away from the intended drop zone (see Orbital Drop Scatter diagram). Next, roll 4d4 to determine how far off-course you land (divide this number by 5 and round down for mech scale). If you controlled your descent long enough and passed enough Control Scatter checks you may actually reduce the 4d4 to 0 dice and therefore land on your intended space.
Landing When you land, you must make a Safe Landing pilot maneuver check against DC 20, plus any terrain and/or environment modifiers. If you have not passed any Control Descent checks, this maneuver check automatically fails. If you pass the this check, you land without damage and may take your turn. If the check fails, you land poorly, the mech immediately falls prone (see Prone) and your locomotion system gains the malfunctioning condition.
Example
Sparky is in Tombstone, a large mech (size category 4). He eyes off a nice clear Drop Zone and leaps from the starship. He rolls 5 on the 1d4+1 to see how long the fall will be, Tombstone will fall for 5 rounds. Sparky fails the initial Control Descent check during the first round of falling, Tombstone is falling sideways! Luckily, in the second round he passed the Control Descent check and turns Tombstone the right way up. During the last three rounds of falling Sparky passes two of the Control Scatter checks.
Just before he lands, Sparky rolls 6 on the 1d8 to determine that he will fall south of the intended Drop Zone. He’s landing into character scale combat. Sparky then rolls 3 on the 2d4 for the scatter distance (two dice less than normal because he passed two Control Scatter rolls). Tombstone will land 3 squares south of his intended Drop Zone.
As he lands, Sparky messes up, he fails his Safe Landing roll. Tombstone descended safely (eventually) but landed heavily. The big fella falls prone and takes the Malfunctioning condition to his locomotion. Sparky’s turn ends because he’s fallen prone.

If sparky had not passed any Control Descent checks, he would have scattered, landed prone and taken 20d10 damage ([4x5] x d10s)

Over-run Maneuver Check
An over-run maneuver is when you move through a target's space and keep going, but you aim to deal damage to the target as you pass or over it. To make this maneuver you must move to a space adjacent to and before the target. Make a melee attack against the target's AC. If the attack deals damage, resolve that damage, and the target must make a piloting maneuver check against your AC or become prone.Targets not in a mech make a Reflex save. After a succesful attack, you may move the rest of your movement. You cannot make an over-run maneuver if you do not have enough movement allowance to move out of the target's spaces. If you fail to hit the target, you must make a piloting maneuver check against the target's AC or your mech falls prone in the space it attacked from. For this check the target's AC is increased by the number of size categories it is larget than you, or decreased by the number of size categories it is smaller than you.

Overland Travel
A mech stat block states an overland speed entry. While not in combat your mech can travel this distance per hour. Each mech stat bock also states the bulk they can carry. The first entry is the bulk the mech may carry before being overloaded, the second figure, in brackets, is the maximum bulk the mech may carry. Overloaded mechs move at half speed and have -4 to all maneuver checks. Tracking weapons do not suffer this penalty. Immobile mechs cannot move and cannot attack with any weapons other than turrets or tracking weapons. While immobile, attacking with turret weapons suffers -4.

Prone
You are lying on the ground. If you become prone on your turn, your turn immediately ends. While prone you take a -8 penalty to melee attack rolls, you gain a +4 bonus to your Armor Class against direct ranged attacks, but you take a -4 penalty to your Armor Class against melee attacks and tracking ranged attacks. You cannot make attacks of opportunity while you are prone in a mech. Standing up from prone is a move action (see Stand-up).

Ram Maneuver Check
A ram attack is when you deliberately run your mech into a target to deal damage. To make a ram attack, move at least half your base speed to a space adjacent to and in front of the target, then make a pilot maneuver check against the target's AC. If your check succeeds you deal double your melee damage to the target, but you suffer damage equal to half the damage you deal. If you deal damage to a mech you size or smaller, you also knock the target back 5 feet, plus 5 additional feet for every 5 by which the result of your attack roll exceeds the target's KAC+ 8. If an obstacle is in the way, the target stops at the obstacle instead. If you fail to hit the target, you must make a piloting maneuver check against the target's AC or your mech falls prone in the space it attacked from. For this check the target's AC is increased by the number of size categories it is larget than you, or decreased by the number of size categories it is smaller than you.

Running Possible Maneuver Check
Running is a full round action that enables you to move your mech twice the distance of its base speed. A run maneuver does not normally require a skill check. A piloting maneuver check is required if you have the glitched or malfunctioning condition on the mech's locomotive system (see Critical Conditions). You cannot move let alone run if you have the wrecked condition on your locomotion. Some environmental or terrain factors may require a piloting maneuver check regardless of critical conditions. A failed run check means your mech falls prone.

Stand-up Possible Maneuver Check
Standing up from a prone position is a full round action that does not require a piloting maneuver check so long as your mech does not have critical conditions to locomotion. If your locomotion has the glitched or malfunctioning condition, the stand-up action requires a piloting maneuver check (see Critical Conditions). You cannot stand up if you have the wrecked condition on your locomotion.

Swimming Possible Maneuver Check
Mechs don't swim, so much as they walk through water. While moving at base speed or less you can move through water up to a quarter height of the mech without penalty. Water between one quarter the mech's height and the mech's full height is shallow water for the mech, but is considered difficult terrain which reduces the mech's speed by half. Attempting any maneuver in shallow water requires a piloting maneuver check. Any water deeper than the mech's full height is deep water for that mech. In deep water, speed is reduced to a quarter and any maneuver requires a check and suffers a -4 penalty. Failing any maneuver check in shallow or deep water causes the mech to become prone. Any mech that enters deep water or becomes prone in shallow or deep water must deal with water pressure and possible flooding (see Cockpits).

Terrain
Mechs are made to traverse difficult ground, it's one of the primary reasons they were developed. What constitutes difficult terrain for a mech is ultimately up to the GM as difficult terrain for a mech may be very different too difficult terrain for a humanoid. Lose soil or moderately uneven ground is not difficult terrain for a mech. Shallow water or broken ground may be difficult terrain. Light vegetation that would slow a humanoid may not be but, heavy growth and what may be impassable growth to a humanoid may be. Difficult terrain halves movement speed. The DC of any maneuver made on difficult terrain is increased by 5, at a minimum.

Turning Possible Maneuver Check
Mechs are heavy cumbersome metal constructions. Whilst they are fitted with gyros and jet stabilizers they are not the most graceful constructs in the galaxy. When you make sudden or difficult turns you must make a piloting maneuver check. The DC of the check depends on speed and movement scale (the DCs can be found in the table below). Before you move you must declare your the speed and path you will be taking. Once your movement is plotted, make any required piloting maneuver checks for turning. If you fail a check your mech falls prone in the space it was turning in to. When your mech becomes prone your turn ends. This means that your mech may fall over halfway through your movement. Turn angle is calculated from the center of the base of the mech.
Attacking While Turning Making sudden or dangerous turns makes it difficult to track targets in combat. Each complex turn accumulates a penalty to attack and maneuver checks. The more you turn the higher the penalty will accumulate to. This penalty lasts until the start of your next turn. Tracking weapons do not suffer this penalty.
Character Scale Character scale maps utilize 5 ft. squares. In this scale a mech can turn at angles of 45°, 90° and 180°. Turning at 45° is relatively safe at any speed. A 45° turn requires no check and does not contribute to piloting or maneuver penalties. A square figure can not be oriented at a 45° to fit within map grids. When turned 45° place a marke to indicate facing or simply make a note of such. Turning 90° while moving at or below base speed requires no check but it does accumulate the piloting and maneuvering penalty by -1 penalty. Turning 90° while moving greater than base speed requires a piloting maneuver check against DC 15. The -1 penalty is also accumulated. Turning 180° is dangerous for mechs. A 90° turn requires a piloting maneuver check against DC 20. Turning 180° adds -2 to the accumulating piloting and maneuver penalty.
Mech Scale Mech scale maps utilize 25 ft. hexagons. In this scale, a mech can turn at angles of 60°, 120° and 180°. Turning 60° is relatively safe at any speed. A 60° turn requires no check and does not contribute to piloting or maneuver penalties. Turning 120° at or below base speed requires no piloting check but does impose -1 to the accumulating attack and maneuver check penalty. Turning 120° while moving above base speed requires a piloting maneuver check against DC20. The -1 penalty is also accumulated. Turning 180° at or below base speed requires a piloting maneuver check against DC 20. Turning 180° above base speed increases the DC to 25. Turning 180° adds -2 to the accumulating piloting and maneuver penalty.
Table: Turning Maneuver
Turning Maneuver
Character Scale45°-90°-180°
total move at or below base speedno check -no check-DC20
total move over base speedno check-DC15-DC20
Accumulating Penalty (per turn made)---1--2
Mech Scale-60°-120°180°
total move at or below base speed-no check-no checkDC20
total move over base speed-no check-DC20DC25
Accumulating Penalty (per turn made)----1-2
Character Scale Example
Tombstone (our mech) starts at the blue position. He wants to move to the black position. To do this the player plots a course. He will move to the yellow position, turn 90°, move to the red position and turn 90° again. He will finish his movement at the black position. Tombstone's total move will be 45 ft. (his base movement is 250 ft.). The big guy needs to make two 90° turns and one 45° turn. Because his total movement is under his base movement, Tombstone doesn't have to make any piloting maneuver checks for the three turns. Tombstone makes it to the black position. Unfortunately, because he made the two 90° turns, Sparky (our pilot) will suffer an accumulated -2 to any attack or maneuver checks until the beginning of his next turn, Sparky doesn't suffer any accumulated penalty for the 45° turn.
Mech Scale Example
Sparky’s back in Tombstone. He's taking fire and needs to get behind cover. He starts at the blue position and wants to make it to the black position behind the wall. The player plots out a course. Staring from the blue position he will move to the yellow position, make a 60° turn, and move to the red position where he'll make a 120° turn, then he jets it to the black position where he screeches out a 180° turn. Tombstone will move a total of 175 ft., which is still way under his base movement. Because he's moving under his base speed, Sparky doesn't need to make a check for the 60° or 120° turns. He does need to make a piloting maneuver check for the 180° turn. In this case the player passes the check, Sparky has delivered Tombstone to the black position, but, he will suffer -3 to all attack and maneuver checks until the start of his next turn: -1 because of the 120° turn around the wall and -2 because of that harebrained 180° he pulled at the end.

Zero-G Possible Maneuver Check
Mechs are not inherently designed for operation in zero gravity. A sealed cockpit is designed to ward general environmental conditions, not the pressure of space. Systems can be installed to allow for zero gravity operations, in which case, any maneuver or attack made in a weightless environment suffers the penalty in the system's description. A mech that is capable of extended exposure to space can use thruster systems to maneuver. Keep in mind that mech weapons deal damage in character scale not starship scale. A mech deals one tenth damage to starships. A mech that takes damage from a starship weapon takes ten x10 damage, just like every other character scale object. Mechs that are capable of functioning in zero gravity environments do so as if the environment were a normal planet surface, in such a case running would not require a maneuver check but turning suddenly or at high speeds would.